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Ogilvie Fleet News & Blog

Government plan to ban petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040

Posted on by Mark Knight

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The Government has this week announced plans to improve air quality by ending the sale of conventional petrol and diesel cars by 2040. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has announced the changes as part of the £3billion air quality plan which includes a host of initiatives to reduce roadside emissions.

The ban won’t include hybrid vehicles, those with a smaller engine and battery-power capability, which already make up a significant portion of Ogilvie’s growing fleet of over 15,000 vehicles.

The Government also has an ambitious plan to only have zero emission vehicles on the roads by 2050. 

DEFRA’s air quality plan includes a number of ideas to provide cleaner transport and improved air quality, including:

Ultra-Low Emission Vehicles (ULEV) including a £100million investment in the UK’s charging infrastructure and plug-in vehicle grants. 

£290million towards reducing transport emissions including new and retrofitted buses and plug-in taxis.

£1.2 billion towards The Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

With almost 200 electric and hybrid vehicles models currently available in today’s market, and with many more ULEV scheduled to be launched in the next 12 months alone, the UK is well placed to meet the target. ULEV’s are Ultra Low Emission Vehicles with a sub 75g/km of CO2 emissions rating.

As member of the Go Ultra-Low scheme, Ogilvie Fleet company car users are encouraged to choose ULEV vehicles, with charging points available at all of Ogilvie’s UK offices.

Ogilvie Fleet has also partnered with Pod Point, one of the UK’s leading providers of home electric car charging stations, with government grants available for most vehicles.  

If you would like to know more about how Ogilvie Fleet can help your company run ULEVs then please do not hesitate to contact us.

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